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A group of Russian and British physicists brought a universal quantum computer closer to reality

A group of Russian and British physicists brought a universal quantum computer closer to reality

A group of Russian and British engineers designed a superconducting quantum state detector capable of capturing magnetic fields at ultralow temperatures. This invention will accelerate the creation of a functioning quantum computer.

The device consists of two aluminum superconducting circuits connected by Josephson junctions. The phase difference of wave functions on the circuit sections provokes a sinusoidal current leap, causing a change in quantum numbers in the circuits. The circuits are placed one above the other on a flat chip.

"Our technology is surprisingly simple. We used standard superconducting materials and usual manufacturing methods: electron-beam lithography and high-vacuum aluminum deposition," explained Vladimir Gurtovoy, one of the authors of the article in Nano Letters. "And we got a system that has not been studied before."

Physicists cooled the detector to 0.6K, that is, below the superconducting Al transition temperature, and the bias current was started. In the alternating magnetic field, voltage jumps were observed, which are typical for changes in the quantum states of circuits. The amplitude fluctuated with a period corresponding to the flux quantum, passing through the detector.

Ultimately, this is a kind of SQUID quantum interface experiments, only the researchers used an unusual geometric superconducting circuit connection.

 

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